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Astam village trek ( 1 night 2 days)

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Astam village: 1 night, 2 days of trekking Highlights of the Astam village trek: Admire the 360-degree panoramic view of the Himalayas and hilly lands The Happiest hiking near Pokhara Discover the typical village lifestyle  Enjoy the organic lunch Delve into the village farming life Beautiful sunrise and sunset views TRIP OVERVIEW: Trip Duration: 1 night, 2 days. Max Altitude: 1568m Start: Pokhara End: Pokhara Difficulty: Easy Transport: Private Vehicle and local bus Accommodation: Private Room in Tea Houses Group Size: For individuals, friends, and family members. All our treks are private. Meals: All included Itinerary  Astam village via Australian camp & Dhampus 1 Night, 2 Days Trek  Astam and Dhampus are typical Nepali mountain villages in the Annapurna region. They offer a real taste of village life in Nepal,…
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One day hike to Sarangkot then to Naudanda and back to Pokhara

One day hike to Sarangkot then to Naudanda and back to Pokhara

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[metaslider id="5547"] Itinerary: Begin your day at Sarangkot, where you awaken to the awe-inspiring views of the Annapurna Massif, Machhapuchhre, Lamjung Himal, and Hiunchuli. As you open your eyes, you're greeted by the majestic peaks of the Himalayas and the serene beauty of the Pokhara valley below. Take a moment to soak in the breathtaking scenery, letting the tranquility of the mountains wash over you. After savoring this peaceful morning, indulge in a hearty breakfast to fuel your adventures ahead. Then, set out on a leisurely hike from Sarangkot towards Naudanda. The trail meanders through lush forests and terraced farms, offering glimpses of local life and the natural wonders of the region. With each step, you're treated to sweeping vistas of snow-capped peaks and verdant valleys, creating a truly immersive…
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An introduction to Tibetan Opera.

An introduction to Tibetan Opera.

An introduction to Tibetan Opera
An introduction to Tibetan Opera   Tibetan Opera or Ace Lhamo (Sister Fairies) in Tibetan is an ancient art form that boasts a history of over 600 years. Some historians trace its roots further back to Tibet’s pre-Buddhist era, when Bon was the main religion, thus making Tibetan Opera one of the oldest forms of theatre in the world. One of the most cited theories about the origin of Tibetan Opera involves a legend about a 14th century monk named Thang Tong Gyalpo. According to the story, Thang Tong Gyalpo, who was born in Shigatse county in Tibet, embarked on a fund-raising campaign in order to build a host of bridges across the country after seeing that many people were not able to reach their destinations due to their inability…
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Losar: The Tibetan New Year 

Losar: The Tibetan New Year 

Losar: Tibetan New Year
Losar is the Tibetan language translates to New Year. Lo means year and sar means new. It is one of the major festivals of the Tibetan people as it marks the beginning of a new year of the Tibetan lunar calendar. This year, the first day of Losar falls on March 3rd which is the start of the year 2149 according to the Tibetan calendar. While official celebrations start on the first day of the new year, preparations begin much earlier. Tibetans spend days leading up to the new year engaged in rituals to rid oneself of the negativities and bad luck of the previous year. This period which starts two days ahead of Losar is known as Gutor. The first Gutor or Nyi Shu Gu falls on the 29th…
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A brief intro  to Tibetan Medical System

A brief intro to Tibetan Medical System

Tibetan medicine
The Tibetan Medical System or Sowa Rigpa (in Tibetan) is one of the oldest medical traditions in the world with a history dating back to 200 BC. It is also one of the three principal systems of medicine in Asia. Closely linked with the spiritual philosophy of Buddhism, the Tibetan Medical System is based on the book rGyud-bZHi or the Four Tantras written by Yuthog Yonten Gonpo. The book was first published in the 8th century and remains the fundamental medical text even today. This text was based primarily on Tibet’s indigenous medical system, but it also incorporated various Asian medical traditions. The experiences and observations of the early Tibetan inhabitants who discovered natural remedies for nearly all types of health problems formed the basis for the Tibetan medical system.…
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An introduction to Tibetan Language

An introduction to Tibetan Language

Tibetan language
The Tibetan language belongs to the Tibeto-Burman group of the Sino-Tibetan language family. It is spoken by over six million people, mainly residing in the Tibetan Autonomous Region and in parts of India, Nepal, and Bhutan. The Tibetan language is generally divided into four main dialect groups. The Central dialect or the Lhasa dialect is the most commonly spoken dialect due to it being the basis for the Standard Tibetan language. Along with Chinese, it is also the official language of the Tibetan Autonomous Region. The other dialects are: Kham dialect, Amdo dialect and Ladakhi dialect.As the name suggests these dialects are spoken by people from the regions of Kham in eastern Tibet, Amdo in the northeast part of Tibet and Ladakh in northern India. These languages share the same…
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A guide to Tibetan refugee settlements in Pokhara.

A guide to Tibetan refugee settlements in Pokhara.

Tibetan refugee settlement
Pokhara is home to thousands of Tibetan refugees, the majority of whom live within the four refugee settlement camps namely Tashi Palkel, Tashi Ling, Paljorling and Jampaling. These camps, some in existence since the mid-1960s, were originally meant to provide temporary shelter to Tibetan refugees, but have turned into permanent settlements. If you are visiting Pokhara and are interested in learning more about the history of Tibetan refugees in Nepal, then a visit to these settlement camps is one of the best things to do. Established in 1962, Tashi Palkel is the oldest Tibetan settlement camp in Pokhara. It’s located in Pokhara’s outskirts, approximately 5km northwest to the town of Hemja. As soon as you enter the camp, you will feel transported to a different world. If you encounter a…
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A guide to Tibetan Food

A guide to Tibetan Food

Tibetan food
If there’s one word that best defines Tibetan food, it is: hearty. The cuisine is rich, often heavy, but always deeply satisfying. Tibetan dishes are primarily made up of meat, grains and dairy, a result of its geography where fresh vegetables and herbs are scarce. Despite a limited list of ingredients, Tibetan cuisine has a diverse range of dishes ranging from stews and noodle soups to dumplings and dry meat. Here, we list 5 quintessential Tibetan dishes. Tsampa Tsampa is a staple throughout Tibet and across the world where Tibetan refugees have built homes. The roasted barley flour is versatile in its use and is eaten both for breakfast and dinner. For breakfast, tsampa is traditionally eaten with a cup of butter tea. You can also choose to add a…
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Experience a Pokhara Tour of a Tibetan Refugee Settlement

Experience a Pokhara Tour of a Tibetan Refugee Settlement

Tibetan refugee settlement
A Tibetan Encounter Pokhara tour of refugee settlements provides a rich experience of Tibetan culture. This culture is rich, and the Tibetan people are very proud of it, and they put great effort in preserving it. This culture forms the basis of their identity which makes them distinct from people who come from other regions. The major notable aspect about Tibetan culture is that it is characterised by a strong traditional background. [caption id="attachment_1563" align="aligncenter" width="995"] Recent Pokhara tour group enjoys Tibetan tea at a the home of a local Tibetan family[/caption] The culture of Tibetan people is rich and is admired by many people. Measures are taken to preserve this culture and people from different places can learn a lot in terms of cultural exchange. The Tibetan people have…
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